Happy book birthday to Forces of Nature!

Animated GIF of TTL Forces of Nature cover
Animated GIF of TTL Forces of Nature cover

TWO TRUTHS AND A LIE: FORCES OF NATURE, the third book in the series, is final­ly here! So, what’s this one about? Here’s an overview:

Crazy-but-true sto­ries make this acclaimed non­fic­tion series per­fect for fans of curiosi­ties and wonders—and any­one look­ing to explore ways to sep­a­rate fact from fiction.

Did you know stud­ies have shown that too many fid­get spin­ners spin­ning in the same direc­tion could poten­tial­ly have an adverse effect on Earth’s grav­i­ta­tion­al field? Or that there’s a com­pa­ny that can turn your deceased loved one’s remains into a dia­mond? Or that the loud­est record­ed sound in his­to­ry was made by the erup­tion of a vol­cano in 1883, whose echo­ing blast cir­cled the plan­et at least three times?

Wel­come to Two Truths and a Lie: Forces of Nature! You’ve heard of the game: Every sto­ry in this book is strange and astound­ing, but one out of every three is an out­right lie. Pick­ing out the fakes isn’t as easy as you think, how­ev­er. Some false sto­ries are based on truth, and some of the true sto­ries are just plain unbe­liev­able! Don’t be fooled by the pho­tos that accom­pa­ny each story—it’s going to take all your smarts and some clever research to fer­ret out the truth.

From a man who gave him­self an appen­dec­to­my to radio sig­nals from oth­er plan­ets to eagles that have been trained to take out spy drones, the sto­ries in this third install­ment in the Two Truths and a Lie series will amaze you! Just don’t believe every­thing you read.…

(Walden Pond Press/HarperCollins, June 2019)

Cre­at­ing a book is a high­ly col­lab­o­ra­tive process, and this book has had an incred­i­ble team work­ing on it from day one. Many, many thanks to my co-author, Ammi-Joan Paque­tte; our agent, Erin Mur­phy; our edi­tor, Jor­dan Brown; and all the won­der­ful folks at Walden Pond Press and Harper­Collins. It’s been an hon­or and a joy to work with you all on this book and the entire TWO TRUTHS AND A LIE series!

Buy it now, at your local inde­pen­dent book­store, or any­where books are sold! 

What I’ve Been Up To This Month

The month isn’t even over yet, but so much has been packed into the last few weeks it feels more like two months already! That’s not exact­ly an excuse for neglect­ing the blog, but, you know, life hap­pens. Anyway…

Beachside Nonfiction Workshop

I start­ed out the month at the Beach­side Non­fic­tion Work­shop with Can­dace Flem­ing & Jen­nifer Swan­son. It was amaz­ing! The fac­ul­ty were all stel­lar, the loca­tion was gor­geous, and the atten­dees were love­ly. It was fun hang­ing out with oth­er non­fic­tion geeks for an entire week­end. We all strug­gled to answer the “So, what do you write?” ques­tion, how­ev­er, since we can usu­al­ly just get away with “Non­fic­tion,” and have that be the end of it! I did­n’t take near­ly enough pho­tos, but here’s the view from my hotel balcony…

Yes, it was hard work. There were a lot of ses­sions, and they were most­ly mas­ter lev­el, plus net­work­ing and cri­tiques. I came away with so much use­ful infor­ma­tion and new ideas to apply to my works in progress. There were obvi­ous­ly some oth­er perks, too! 

Seattle Reading Council Appearance

In the mid­dle of the month, some of the mem­bers of my cri­tique group (and all agency-mates at Erin Mur­phy Lit­er­ary, as it turns out!), did an appear­ance at the Seat­tle Read­ing Coun­cil. It was a billed as a “Books and Choco­late” event… what could be bet­ter?! We each talked about our books and process and then took ques­tions. The crowd was most­ly teach­ers and librar­i­ans, so it made for a won­der­ful evening of shar­ing book love (and choco­late!) among like­mind­ed new friends. 

School visits

I had an ele­men­tary school vis­it where I got to talk to sev­er­al third-grade class­es about my writ­ing jour­ney, grit, and writ­ing with emo­tion, as well as sev­er­al fifth-grade class­es about eval­u­at­ing sources and spot­ting fake news. It was an awe­some vis­it with super-engaged audi­ences, but alas, no pho­tos. You’ll have to take my word for it!

I have anoth­er vis­it com­ing up ear­ly in June (the last one of the school year!), so I’ve been mak­ing sure every­thing is ready for that one, too. 

SCBWI-WWA Spring Conference

Final­ly, I attend­ed and helped with the SCBWI West­ern Wash­ing­ton’s spring con­fer­ence, Imag­ine That! It was a great week­end: hear­ing from inspir­ing speak­ers, get­ting feed­back on one of my works in progress from a pow­er­house edi­tor, and catch­ing up with author and illus­tra­tor friends in the indus­try. I’m still soak­ing it all up and pro­cess­ing what was said! Good stuff.

Book Releases!

Along with all of that I’ve been get­ting ready for the Two Truths and a Lie: His­to­ries and Mys­ter­ies paper­back release on May 21 AND prepar­ing for the upcom­ing new release of Two Truths and a Lie: Forces of Nature on June 25th! I’ve designed and ordered post­cards and swag, sched­uled social media announce­ments, and made oth­er plans to get the word out. 

TTL: Histories and Mysteries cover
TTL: Forces of Nature cover
 

Works in Progress…

And, of course, there are those works in progress, too! Ear­li­er this month I sub­mit­ted both a non­fic­tion pic­ture book revi­sion and a graph­ic nov­el pro­pos­al to my agent. I’m cur­rent­ly revis­ing a non­fic­tion pic­ture book, a fic­tion pic­ture book, and a mid­dle-grade non­fic­tion man­u­script. I’m also work­ing on a brand-new non­fic­tion pic­ture book draft and a young-adult non­fic­tion pro­pos­al. Busy, busy!

Yes, I do love my job. More so every day, in fact! =D

Happy National Trivia Day!

Two Truths and a Lie: Histories and Mysteries cover

Two Truths and a Lie: Histories and Mysteries cover
It may itself be a lit­tle-known fact, but Jan­u­ary 4th is Nation­al Triv­ia Day! To cel­e­brate, I thought I’d post some triv­ia tid­bits from Two Truths and a Lie: His­to­ries and Mys­ter­ies. Remem­ber, ONE of the claims in each set of three below fol­low­ing is false. Can you fig­ure out which one in each trio is the fake triv­i­um? (Did you know triv­ia is the plur­al of trivium?)
 

A.

  1. There’s an aban­doned cruise ship loaded with crazed, can­ni­bal rats drift­ing around some­where in the Atlantic Ocean. Beware!
  2. A banyan tree in Pak­istan was put under arrest by a British army offi­cer in 1898 and is still in chains today. Par­don, anyone?
  3. It’s ille­gal to chew gum in Singapore.

 

B.

  1. Ben Franklin wrote a trea­tise on why sci­en­tists should try to find a way to make farts smell better.
  2. Dog Island is an island oasis ded­i­cat­ed to let­ting dogs live out their wilder natures, undis­turbed by humans. Be free, Fifi.
  3. There’s an annu­al fes­ti­val in Spain cen­tered around throw­ing toma­toes at peo­ple. Food fight!

 

C.

  1. The old­est known den­tal fill­ings date back to between 12,740 and 13,000 years ago, and they were filled with, essen­tial­ly, tar. Ew.
  2. It’s ille­gal to own a pet tur­tle in Ice­land, and 1 in 10 chil­dren there grow up to become authors.
  3. I was once trapped in an ele­va­tor, alone, overnight. Scary!

 
If you don’t know all of the answers, go do some research and see if you can fig­ure them out! But be care­ful… things might not always be what they seem at first glance, and truth often is stranger than fiction.
For even more triv­ia fun, check out this post from Men­talFloss on Nation­al Triv­ia Day last year. I espe­cial­ly love the one about Ben & Jer­ry’s ice cream. (I’m a huge fan of their new Urban Bour­bon flavor!)
If you enjoyed these true (and not so true) triv­ia facts for Nation­al Triv­ia Day, or want to check your answers, make sure to check out the book: Two Truths and a Lie: His­to­ries and Mys­ter­ies!
Do you have any favorite triv­ia tid­bits? Please post them in the com­ments below (and be sure to warn us if they might not be 100% true)!

Happy holidays (and a gift idea)!


Are you buy­ing any of my books to give as a gift this hol­i­day sea­son? If so, thank you!
I’d be thrilled to send you a signed book­plate and some book swag for you to include with your gift. Just send an email to laurie@lauriethompson.com with the details (which book, to whom it should be per­son­al­ized, and what mail­ing address you’d like it sent to), and I’ll pop them in the mail for you ASAP.
And, again, thank you! It’s like giv­ing a gift to me, too. =D
Be a Changemaker gift wrapped

Review: Three Stars in the Night Sky

Zoo Scientists cover

Three Stars in the Night Sky cover

THREE STARS IN THE NIGHT SKY
by Fern Schumer Chapman
Gussie Rose Press/June 6, 2018
Grades 5–8, 56 pages

Here’s what the pub­lish­er says:

At the age of 12, Ger­da Katz fled Nazi Ger­many and came to Amer­i­ca all by her­self. Decades before the label gained recog­ni­tion, she became what’s now known as an “unac­com­pa­nied minor.” Gerda’s sto­ry of fam­i­ly sep­a­ra­tion reflects the dis­lo­cat­ing trau­ma, cul­ture shock, and excru­ci­at­ing lone­li­ness many unac­com­pa­nied minor immi­grants expe­ri­ence. As Ger­da becomes an Amer­i­can, she nev­er stops long­ing to be reunit­ed with her fam­i­ly. Three Stars in the Night Sky illu­mi­nates the per­son­al dam­age of racism in three coun­tries – Nazi Ger­many, the Domini­can Repub­lic, and the Unit­ed States dur­ing the 1930s and 40s — and the emo­tion­al dev­as­ta­tion of a child com­ing to a new coun­try alone.

And here are my thoughts:
This was an engag­ing, up close and per­son­al look at an his­tor­i­cal event that is sad­ly still rel­e­vant today for many rea­sons, includ­ing under­stand­ing World War II, anti-Semi­tism, refugees, and the very real impacts of immi­gra­tion poli­cies. There is also local rel­e­van­cy here in west­ern Wash­ing­ton state, as Ger­da emi­grat­ed to Seat­tle to escape the per­se­cu­tion of Jews in Ger­many in 1938 and wound up fac­ing the intern­ment of the region’s Japan­ese-Amer­i­can cit­i­zens. I found the sto­ry and accom­pa­ny­ing images to be inter­est­ing as well as infor­ma­tive. The for­mat makes it looks like a pic­ture book, but I would not rec­om­mend it for younger read­ers due to the sen­si­tive top­ics cov­ered and the way in which they are pre­sent­ed here. High­ly rec­om­mend­ed for grades 5 and up, how­ev­er, whether as part of learn­ing more about the World War II era or look­ing at cur­rent events through a his­tor­i­cal lens. Ger­da’s sto­ry will stick with me for some time to come, and I’m thank­ful to have had the oppor­tu­ni­ty to read about it.
For more books by this author, vis­it https://fernschumerchapman.com/.
*** Dis­clo­sure: I received a review copy from the pub­lish­er as part of judg­ing the CYBILS contest. ***
Facts First! Nonfiction Monday

Review: Votes for Women!

Facts First! Nonfiction Monday

Votes for Women! cover
Votes for Women! Amer­i­can Suf­frag­ists and the Bat­tle for the Ballot
by Winifred Conkling
Algo­nquin Young Read­ers, Feb­ru­ary 13, 2018

Grades 8–12, 320 pages

Here’s what the publisher says about Votes for Women!:

For near­ly 150 years, Amer­i­can women did not have the right to vote. On August 18, 1920, they won that right, when the 19th Amend­ment to the Con­sti­tu­tion was rat­i­fied at last. To achieve that vic­to­ry, some of the fiercest, most pas­sion­ate women in his­to­ry marched, protest­ed, and some­times even broke the law—for more than eight decades.
From Susan B. Antho­ny and Eliz­a­beth Cady Stan­ton, who found­ed the suf­frage move­ment at the 1848 Seneca Falls Con­ven­tion, to Sojourn­er Truth and her famous “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech, to Alice Paul, arrest­ed and force-fed in prison, this is the sto­ry of the Amer­i­can women’s suf­frage move­ment and the pri­vate lives that fueled its lead­ers’ ded­i­ca­tion. Votes for Women! explores suf­frag­ists’ often pow­er­ful, some­times dif­fi­cult rela­tion­ship with the inter­sect­ing tem­per­ance and abo­li­tion cam­paigns, and includes an unflinch­ing look at some of the ugli­er moments in women’s fight for the vote.
By turns illu­mi­nat­ing, har­row­ing, and empow­er­ing, Votes for Women! paints a vibrant pic­ture of the women whose tire­less bat­tle still inspires polit­i­cal, human rights, and social jus­tice activism.

And what the critics say about Votes for Women!:

  • “This is a fas­ci­nat­ing account of the bumpy road to women’s suf­frage in the U.S.… Well-cho­sen black-and-white archival repro­duc­tions and pho­tographs ably sup­port the text, which makes excel­lent use of pri­ma­ry sources, includ­ing excerpts from let­ters and writ­ings to bring key per­son­al­i­ties to life.” —The Horn Book Mag­a­zine (starred review)
  • “From the first Women’s Rights Con­ven­tion in Seneca Falls in 1848 to the rat­i­fi­ca­tion of the 19th Amend­ment in 1920, this is a com­mand­ing and rel­e­vant account of sweep­ing, hard-won social reform and action.” —Pub­lish­ers Week­ly (starred review)
  • “Span­ning mul­ti­ple cen­turies, this work may be the most com­pre­hen­sive account for young read­ers about the founders, lead­ers, orga­niz­ers, and oppo­nents of the Amer­i­can suf­frag­ist move­ment … Con­kling deliv­ers a tour de force.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
  • “Look­ing for a com­pre­hen­sive, well-writ­ten his­to­ry of women’s fight for the right to vote? You’ve found it. Con­kling draws read­ers in  … this is great for research as well as a good read.” —Book­list
  • “The intense dra­ma of the 72-year bat­tle for women’s suf­frage springs vivid­ly to life from the pages of this com­pul­sive­ly read­able account.” —School Library Journal

And here are my thoughts about Votes for Women!:

I lis­tened to this one as an audio­book as part of judg­ing the CYBILS con­test. I also plan to check out the print ver­sion so I can see the images and backmatter.
From the open­ing scene to the final chap­ter, I was com­plete­ly drawn in. I thought I knew a fair bit about the his­to­ry of the wom­en’s suf­frage move­ment, but it turns out I had only super­fi­cial knowl­edge of the peo­ple and events involved. I’m grate­ful to have been enlight­ened, although I’ll admit the expe­ri­ence was­n’t always easy nor pleas­ant. There were times when the injus­tices and insults endured by the women made me sput­ter with out­rage. And there were oth­er times when I was, lit­er­al­ly, reduced to tears by the way they were treat­ed. But most­ly I was grate­ful for the courage and per­sis­tence of these hero­ic female lead­ers and buoyed by it. Con­kling has brought these icons to life and giv­en us a peek inside their dai­ly lives in addi­tion to their well-known accom­plish­ments. I found it thor­ough­ly engaging.
This book should be required read­ing in schools for both girls and boys. It offers impor­tant lessons not only in his­to­ry but also in equal­i­ty and fair­ness, grit and deter­mi­na­tion, group dynam­ics and social inter­ac­tions, and pow­er and process. It also feels quite time­ly in this era of resis­tance, activism, and #MeToo. High­ly recommended.
Facts First! Nonfiction Monday

Review: Capsized! by Patricia Sutton

Facts First! Nonfiction Monday

Capsized! cover
Cap­sized! The For­got­ten Sto­ry of the SS East­land Disaster
by Patri­cia Sutton
Chica­go Review Press (July 1, 2018)
Grades 5–8, 176 pages

Here’s what the publisher says about Capsized!:

A fas­ci­nat­ing his­tor­i­cal account of courage and tragedy on the Chica­go River
On July 24, 1915, the SS East­land, filled to capac­i­ty with 2,500 pas­sen­gers and crew, cap­sized in the Chica­go Riv­er while still moored to the pier. Hap­py pic­nic-goers head­ed for an employ­ee out­ing across Lake Michi­gan sud­den­ly found them­selves in a strug­gle for their lives. Trapped belowdecks, crushed by the crowds attempt­ing to escape the ris­ing waters, or hurled into the riv­er from the upper deck of the ship, rough­ly one-third of the pas­sen­gers, most­ly women and chil­dren, per­ished that day.
The East­land dis­as­ter took more pas­sen­ger lives than the Titan­ic and stands today as the great­est loss of life on the Great Lakes. Cap­sized! details the events lead­ing up to the fate­ful day and pro­vides a nail-bit­ing, minute-by-minute account of the ship’s cap­siz­ing. From the courage of the sur­vivors to the despair of fam­i­lies who lost loved ones, author Patri­cia Sut­ton brings to light the sto­ries of ordi­nary work­ing peo­ple endur­ing the unthinkable.
Cap­sized! also rais­es crit­i­cal-think­ing ques­tions for young read­ers: Why do we know so much about the Titan­ic’s sink­ing yet so lit­tle about the East­land dis­as­ter? What caus­es a tragedy to be for­got­ten and left out of soci­ety’s col­lec­tive mem­o­ry? And what lessons from this dis­as­ter might we be able to apply today?

And what the critics say about Capsized!:

    • “A true dis­as­ter sto­ry riv­et­ing­ly told.” —Kirkus Reviews
    • “A bad­ly designed ship, a care­less cap­tain, and decks jammed with 2,500 pas­sen­gers are a recipe for dis­as­ter. Patri­cia Sut­ton describes the trag­ic launch­ing of the SS East­land in a dra­mat­ic, riv­et­ing nar­ra­tive filled with the vivid first­hand accounts of those onboard that brings read­ers along on a har­row­ing day trip.” —Jim Mur­phy, author of New­bery Hon­or titles The Great Fire and An Amer­i­can Plague
    • “A riv­et­ing page-turn­er sure to grab read­ers’ atten­tion. Patri­cia Sutton’s well-researched Cap­sized! will leave you shocked, sad­dened, and unable to put it down.” —Kate Han­ni­gan, author of The Detective’s Assistant
    • “Through metic­u­lous research and vivid prose, Sut­ton brings to life the lit­tle-known sto­ry of the East­land ship dis­as­ter. Based on first­hand accounts of pas­sen­gers, ship work­ers and bystanders, read­ers can expe­ri­ence the peo­ple and events that led to the sink­ing of the fastest steamship on the Great Lakes and its trag­ic after­math.” —Claire Rudolf Mur­phy, author of Gold Rush Women and March­ing with Aunt Susan
    • “The nar­ra­tive-dri­ven account, filled with quotes from indi­vid­u­als and news­pa­pers, his­tor­i­cal pho­tos, and tri­al tran­scripts, is engag­ing and accessible…Extensive source notes, which account for every quote, as well as a bib­li­og­ra­phy, round out this infor­ma­tive, engross­ing title.” —Book­list
    • “Cap­sized! is an excel­lent book for his­tor­i­cal research and high­ly rec­om­mend­ed for both mid­dle and high school libraries.” — KidsReads

And here are my thoughts about Capsized!:

I read this one as part of judg­ing the CYBILS, and I could not put it down! I start­ed read­ing it one night in bed, intend­ing to get in a quick chap­ter or two before turn­ing off the light, but I did­n’t stop until I’d read every last page.
I’m shocked, and frankly a lit­tle appalled, that I’d nev­er heard of this event before. Thank­ful­ly, Sut­ton chose to ded­i­cate her­self to telling this lit­tle-known sto­ry, and she tells it very well. The book itself reads with all the sus­pense and dra­ma of a well-paced nov­el, but you can see the research that went into this true sto­ry in the includ­ed source notes and bib­li­og­ra­phy. I par­tic­u­lar­ly appre­ci­at­ed how Sut­ton spelled out the var­i­ous cumu­la­tive rea­sons for the dis­as­ter: there are many impor­tant lessons to be learned from this sto­ry. I also appre­ci­at­ed the very human con­nec­tions Sut­ton built, let­ting us feel like we real­ly get to know many of the pas­sen­gers and their actions on that trag­ic day: there are lessons to be had there as well.
Giv­ing read­ers both the fac­tu­al account of an event and its emo­tion­al res­o­nance from mul­ti­ple view­points is not easy to do. This book pulls it off; an excel­lent exam­ple of nar­ra­tive non­fic­tion and one I expect I’ll be going back to as a men­tor text. High­ly recommended!
Facts First! Nonfiction Monday

Review: EAVESDROPPING ON ELEPHANTS

Zoo Scientists cover

Eavesdropping on Elephants cover

EAVESDROPPING ON ELEPHANTS
by Patri­cia Newman
Mill­brook Press/August 1, 2018
Grades 4–8, 56 pages

Here’s what the pub­lish­er says:

Can under­stand­ing how for­est ele­phants com­mu­ni­cate help sci­en­tists find ways to pro­tect this vul­ner­a­ble species? Researcher Katy Pane and oth­ers involved with Cor­nell University’s Ele­phant Lis­ten­ing Project believe it can. Patri­cia New­man takes read­ers behind the scenes to see how sci­en­tists are mak­ing new dis­cov­er­ies about ele­phant com­mu­ni­ca­tion and using what they learn to help these majes­tic animals.
Fea­tures: Author/Illustrator biog­ra­phy, Bibliography/further read­ing, Glos­sary, Index, Maps, Page Plus, Pri­ma­ry source quotations/images, and Reviewed

And what the crit­ics say:

  • A Junior Library Guild Selection
  • “An invit­ing intro­duc­tion to biol­o­gists at work.” —Book­list
  • “…this book does an excel­lent job of trans­port­ing read­ers and pro­vid­ing a clear, mul­ti­fac­eted pic­ture of African for­est elephants…“The more you lis­ten to wildlife, the more your mind opens up to new ideas about why the world is a place worth sav­ing.” VERDICT A great pick for mid­dle school non­fic­tion col­lec­tions.” —School Library Journal
  • “Fas­ci­nat­ing for earnest con­ser­va­tion­ists.” —Kirkus Reviews

And here are my thoughts:
Patri­cia New­man does it again, with anoth­er engag­ing piece of nar­ra­tive non­fic­tion! This is a high­ly engag­ing read about the less well-known African for­est ele­phants and sev­er­al of the sci­en­tists who study them. The sci­ence here–bioacoustics–is quite inter­est­ing and the human sto­ries give it a per­son­al touch. I always appre­ci­ate when we get to see how sci­en­tists real­ly work, and it’s espe­cial­ly reward­ing to get a peek at how they col­lab­o­rate with one anoth­er on their sep­a­rate-but-relat­ed research projects. The book also men­tions some of the con­ser­va­tion aspects involved and even how kids can par­tic­i­pate if they’re so inspired. An added bonus is that most of the sci­en­tists in the book hap­pen to be women, which is so impor­tant for show­ing young girls that they can indeed have an impor­tant career in the sciences.
Final­ly, watch the trail­er to see–and hear–some of the ani­mals from the book!

Facts First! Nonfiction Monday

2018 CYBILS Round 1 judge

2018 Cybils Round 1 Judge logo
2018 CYBILS, here I come! I’m excit­ed to share that I’ll be a CYBILS judge again this year. The CYBILS Awards rec­og­nize authors and illus­tra­tors whose books for chil­dren and young adults com­bine both lit­er­ary mer­it and pop­u­lar appeal. In the past, I’ve always helped with judg­ing the younger non­fic­tion cat­e­go­ry (Non­fic­tion Pic­ture Books in 2011 and 2012, and Elementary/Middle Grade Non­fic­tion in 2014). This time around, how­ev­er, I’ll be a Round 1 Judge in the Junior/Senior High Non­fic­tion cat­e­go­ry, along with the fol­low­ing tal­ent­ed bloggers:

Nom­i­na­tions will open on Octo­ber 1st, and our short­lists will be due in Decem­ber. There are usu­al­ly around 70 entries, so I’ll be doing a LOT of read­ing in the com­ing months. (And hope­ful­ly a lot of blog­ging, too–get ready for those reviews!) Final­ists will be announced in Jan­u­ary, and win­ners are announced in February.
2018 Cybils logo
 

The Histories and Mysteries blog tour roundup

Two Truths and a Lie: Histories and Mysteries cover

Two Truths and a Lie: Histories and Mysteries cover
Our lat­est in the Two Truths and a Lie series, His­to­ries and Mys­ter­ies, has been out for a few weeks now, and we were lucky enough to have it hit the web for its offi­cial blog tour right around pub­li­ca­tion day. Now that the dust has start­ed to set­tle a bit, I want­ed to share all of the in-depth reviews, edu­ca­tion­al mate­ri­als, and bonus con­tent that appeared over the course of the tour.

Many, many thanks to the hard-work­ing blog­gers who help share the book love and get the word out to book buy­ers and read­ers! Also, thank you yet again to the excel­lent folks at Walden Pond Press who put this event togeth­er. xoxo
You can find out more about the book and grab your copy here or here.

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